Category: Education

Budget Breakers

I have been wanting to put this lesson together for awhile. I created an annuity spreadsheet to calculate the long-term impact of various spending habits. What would your retirement income look like if you brewed your coffee at home instead of going to Starbucks or drove a sedan instead of an SUV? When you replace small spending habits over a 30 year period and earn investment returns on the savings, the difference can be tens and even hundreds of thousands of dollars. Check it out:

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Economies of Scale

Is your business idea scalable? How can you increase production, increase profit margins, and decrease the consumer price all at the same time? It’s all about learning strategies for scaling the business, like lowering input costs by buying in bulk and taking advantage of division of labor to hire specialists.

Here is a slideshow I used to teach this to my Intro to Entrepreneurship class:

Students Thinking Critically About Finance

I teach at a school that strongly emphasizes students writing constructed responses to reading materials. This strengthens their reading and writing skills and gets them thinking critically about various topics (these are big standardized testing skills too). Here are some articles and prompts I have given my Personal Financial Responsibility class to think about current topics in finance. Continue reading “Students Thinking Critically About Finance”

Entrepreneurs: The New Adventurers

I am 3 days into the new Intro to Entrepreneurship class that I am teaching to 24 high school students this year. I am already having a blast, as the students—mostly freshmen—are very enthusiastic, despite several of them not being quite sure what entrepreneurship was 3 days ago. We started off by analyzing the etymology of the word entrepreneurship. Etymology is underrated as a tool for studying concepts like this. You get a peek into the cultural perspective of the time and place where the word was first invented. How cool is that?! Continue reading “Entrepreneurs: The New Adventurers”

10 Things I Learned From Teaching a Personal Finance Class

2016-2017 has been one of the craziest years in my teaching career. My principal texted me last July to ask me to teach Personal Financial Responsibility, a course encouraged, but not required, for high school students by the state of Indiana. I accepted the challenge and immediately delved into learning as much as I could to help my students. Nearly a year later, after teaching two sections of the course, I have learned a great deal about finance and about myself. In this article, I would like to share with you what I have learned this year.
Continue reading “10 Things I Learned From Teaching a Personal Finance Class”