Tag: books

Book Review: Meltdown by Chris Clearfield

Meltdown (Clearfield)Our society increasingly relies on complex, tightly coupled systems that handle our healthcare, finances, travel, and more. While those systems can be more productive and theoretically safer, they have vulnerabilities, including the complexity in itself. Sometimes, the addition of more safety features can actually make something less safe by making it more complex and therefore more likely to allow for a mistake to be made. Continue reading “Book Review: Meltdown by Chris Clearfield”

Advertisements

Book Review: Good to Great

good to greatGood to Great, which is sort of a prequel to Collins’s bestselling Built to Last, is a study of 11 established companies that suddenly broke out and outperformed the market in an unbelievable fashion. 11 comparison companies that remained stable in the same industry and environment are used in the study. Continue reading “Book Review: Good to Great”

Book Review: A History of the US in 5 Crashes

history of us in 5 crashesA History of the United States in Five Crashes describes the 1907, 1929, 1987, 2008, and 2010 stock market crashes. Scott Nations’ thesis is that crashes tend to follow a pattern where some new financial construct causes investors to let their guard down. The false sense of security allows for a rapid market run, then some event triggers it to come crashing back down. The introduction of algorithms and computer-directed trading has also sped up this process and created new vulnerabilities in the market. Continue reading “Book Review: A History of the US in 5 Crashes”

Book Review: The End of Alchemy

end of alchemyThe End of Alchemy is the most comprehensive book on financial crises that has been published since the Great Recession. Mervyn King headed up the Bank of England during the 2008 Financial Crisis. However, unlike Timothy Geithner and Ben Bernanke, he doesn’t set out to defend his actions during the crisis or make excuses for questionable decisions. Instead, King criticizes the system that allowed the crisis to happen, allowed the crises before it, and will inevitably create future crises if it is not changed. Continue reading “Book Review: The End of Alchemy”

Millennial Stereotypes Are Sometimes Unavoidable… and Hilarious

millenials

I recently listened to a great interview on Bloomberg’s Odd Lots podcast about how “The Way We Talk About Millennials Is Wrong.” Malcolm Harris, author of Kids These Days: Human Capital and the Making of Millennials, makes an important point about how the identity of the millennial generation is largely created by marketing experts who use overgeneralized ideas to help companies sell stuff to them. Continue reading “Millennial Stereotypes Are Sometimes Unavoidable… and Hilarious”