Tag: economics

Economies of Scale

Is your business idea scalable? How can you increase production, increase profit margins, and decrease the consumer price all at the same time? It’s all about learning strategies for scaling the business, like lowering input costs by buying in bulk and taking advantage of division of labor to hire specialists.

Here is a slideshow I used to teach this to my Intro to Entrepreneurship class:

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Book Review: Economics for Real People

Economics for Real PeopleThe Austrian School approach to the study economics is practical, logical, and accessible. Understanding it gives one an excellent perspective on history, philosophy, politics, business, current events, and daily life. However, there are so many thinkers one needs to explore, starting with Frédérick Bastiat, Carl Menger, Ludwig von Mises, Murray Rothbard, and Friederich A. Hayek. While incredibly enlightening, their works can be overwhelming in their size, depth, and dryness. They can each take quite a while to get through, and there are so many of them. Gene Callahan shrinks the central concepts from the works of Bastiat, Menger, Mises, Rothbard, and Hayek into one reasonably sized volume that is succinct and more colorfully written. Continue reading “Book Review: Economics for Real People”

Wide Your World, Part II: Listen Up!

Mainstream radio is pretty much music, news, sports, and some comedy. The music is mainly the same 10 songs over and over again, with each station having its own slight variation on what those 10 songs are. The news is either mainstream headlines and soundbites or political pundits ranting, usually spewing inaccurate information that is not based on actual research. Sports coverage is 90% NFL football, even when it’s basketball and baseball season. How much are your really getting out of this stuff? It seems more and more like they are just trying to keep you busy between commercials. Most of what is on the radio is the same old noise over and over again.

It’s time to listen up! Upgrade the value of the material you listen to every day. Continue reading “Wide Your World, Part II: Listen Up!”

Entrepreneurs: The New Adventurers

I am 3 days into the new Intro to Entrepreneurship class that I am teaching to 24 high school students this year. I am already having a blast, as the students—mostly freshmen—are very enthusiastic, despite several of them not being quite sure what entrepreneurship was 3 days ago. We started off by analyzing the etymology of the word entrepreneurship. Etymology is underrated as a tool for studying concepts like this. You get a peak into the cultural perspective of the time and place where the word was first invented. How cool is that?! Continue reading “Entrepreneurs: The New Adventurers”

3 Reality Checks the U.S. Needs to Face Before We Reform Health Care

I am not a Democrat, I am not a Republican, and I am not a fan of the political games that the leadership of each party play with our government. I am a independent thinker, and I prefer a rational, quantitative approach to looking at issues and devising solutions to them that are practical, empathy-based, ethical, and constitutional. Politicians at the federal level have shown time and time again that their allegiance is not to the Constitution, to common sense, or to the general welfare of the American people. They serve the minority interests who get them elected and usually re-elected: the establishment leadership of their respective political parties and the campaign donors and special interests who back them. The American Health Care Act (AHCA) is a perfect example of this process in action. Continue reading “3 Reality Checks the U.S. Needs to Face Before We Reform Health Care”