Tag: Economy

Book Review: Stress Test

stress testTimothy Geithner was President of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York from 2003 to 2009 and U.S. Secretary of the Treasury under from 2009 to 2013. Many people would have loved to be a fly on the wall in some of the meetings that Geithner was in during the financial crisis, the Great Recession, and the recovery. Geithner provides some insights, but he is also overly concerned with addressing his critics, especially those he calls “moral hazard fundamentalists.”

He makes some good analogies, although he repeats the same ones again and again, and I don’t think he addresses the fundamental problems that his critics are trying to get to. Sure, TARP assuaged the market by injecting capital into the struggling financial sector, and the taxpayers made a profit off the program in the end. Perhaps moral hazard arguments in reference to TARP are overblown. However, does this really settle the argument about whether or not the government should be bailing out companies? Should calming a volatile market really be the role of the federal government? Continue reading “Book Review: Stress Test”

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These 3 Charts About Student Loans Should Scare Everyone

Rick Rieder, Chief Investment Officer of Global Fixed Income at BlackRock, wrote a startling article on “the economic side effects of the student loan crisis.”

1. Homeownership is on the Decline

chart1-homeownership

2. More Student Loan Debt Among Older Age Groups

chart2-studentloan

3. College Education is Still Key to Employment and Earnings

chart3-earnings

So you have to have a college education to earn decent income and steady employment, but the cost of that degree makes it nearly impossible to purchase a home, save for retirement, etc.

Rieder offers some excellent perspective on why this is some seriously alarming data for the economy.

How the Next Bust is Brewing

Check out my article, “How The Next Bust Is Brewing,” which was just published by Seeking Alpha. It covers…

  • Consumer credit scores have reached a record high.
  • The mistakes that caused the 2008 financial crisis are falling off credit reports.
  • Credit card debt remains on the rise.
  • FICO is lowering the standards for achieving a high credit score.
  • The average American household is a higher credit risk than it appears to be.

These are very concerning developments that every investor should be aware of.