Tag: politics

The Constitutional Case for the EPA

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There has been a lot of attention around President Trump’s director of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Scott Pruitt. It was clear when Pruitt was appointed that the Trump administration was not taking environmental protection seriously. Pruitt has proved this assumption right by spending taxpayer money frivolously as well as using his post to help his wife find a job. While the Obama administration took the EPA’s responsibilities more seriously than this administration, it had its own share of failures, including taking 10 months to act on information that the city of Flint was not properly treating its water to prevent toxic lead contamination. The EPA has needed better direction for a long time. Let’s explore why that is so important. Continue reading “The Constitutional Case for the EPA”

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Market Monday #6: Comparative Advantage

It is Memorial Day, and we are celebrating our freedom by bragging about the economy, putting immigrants in “detention centers” reminiscent of WW2 concentration camps, and punching drunk women on the Jersey shore. We need to realize the value of our fellow human beings, whether they be soldiers, immigrants, or even drunk women on the beach. Let’s stop blaming each other and hurting each other. Empathy is better for morality, but it is also better for the economy. Continue reading “Market Monday #6: Comparative Advantage”

Does Trump Deserve Credit for the Stock Market?

As an advocate for economics education, I get upset when I hear bogus economics claims being made in politics and the media. When this happens, consumers are fooled into spending irresponsibly. Voters are fooled into supporting policies detrimental to the economy. This has been on my mind lately as President Trump doesn’t let a day go by without taking credit for how well the U.S. stock market is doing. Continue reading “Does Trump Deserve Credit for the Stock Market?”

Book Review: Stress Test

stress testTimothy Geithner was President of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York from 2003 to 2009 and U.S. Secretary of the Treasury under from 2009 to 2013. Many people would have loved to be a fly on the wall in some of the meetings that Geithner was in during the financial crisis, the Great Recession, and the recovery. Geithner provides some insights, but he is also overly concerned with addressing his critics, especially those he calls “moral hazard fundamentalists.” Continue reading “Book Review: Stress Test”

Students Thinking Critically About Finance

I teach at a school that strongly emphasizes students writing constructed responses to reading materials. This strengthens their reading and writing skills and gets them thinking critically about various topics (these are big standardized testing skills too). Here are some articles and prompts I have given my Personal Financial Responsibility class to think about current topics in finance. Continue reading “Students Thinking Critically About Finance”

Widen Your World, Part I: Read a Book!

I have recently been reading The Young Entrepreneur’s Guide to Starting and Running a Business by Steve Mariotti. It is a great resource that I am using as the textbook for the Intro to Entrepreneurship class I am teaching this year. In chapter 2, there is a little section called “Widen Your World,” and throughout the book, Mariotti encourages readers to feed their imagination, read more books, and take an active approach to life. Inspired by Mariotti, this post is the first of a series I will be doing on this blog called “Widen Your World.” I am starting with my favorite source of inspiration, books! Continue reading “Widen Your World, Part I: Read a Book!”

3 Reality Checks the U.S. Needs to Face Before We Reform Health Care

I am not a Democrat, I am not a Republican, and I am not a fan of the political games that the leadership of each party play with our government. I am a independent thinker, and I prefer a rational, quantitative approach to looking at issues and devising solutions to them that are practical, empathy-based, ethical, and constitutional. Politicians at the federal level have shown time and time again that their allegiance is not to the Constitution, to common sense, or to the general welfare of the American people. They serve the minority interests who get them elected and usually re-elected: the establishment leadership of their respective political parties and the campaign donors and special interests who back them. The American Health Care Act (AHCA) is a perfect example of this process in action. Continue reading “3 Reality Checks the U.S. Needs to Face Before We Reform Health Care”