Tag: self-improvement

Book Review: Barking Up the Wrong Tree

Barking Up the Wrong TreeBarking Up the Wrong Tree draws on scientific studies and historical examples to answer 6 questions about success:

  1. Should we play it safe and do what we’re told if we want to succeed?
  2. Do nice guys finish last?
  3. Do quitters never win and winners never quit?
  4. Is it more important what you know or who you know?
  5. How important is believing in yourself?
  6. “Work, work work” or “work-life balance?”

The answers are not black and white. Eric Barker finds the most logical approach to each problem based on evidence on both sides of each argument. This book looks through all the hype that is out there in the self-improvement media and consolidates it into simple, practical pieces of advice that you can start using the day you read it. It is a very helpful resource for hard-working individuals who want to do everything it takes to be their best selves.

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Book Review: The Inner Game of Tennis

inner gameBusiness Insider just published a piece about how this book guided the Golden State Warriors through their historic 2016-17 season. The piece shows a photograph of one of the best paragraphs of the book, which Tom Brady tweeted, showing where he wrote in the margin next to it. The Inner Game of Tennis: The Classic Guide to the Mental Side of Peak Performance has helped a lot of successful people get where they are today by focusing on a critical, but unemotional mindset.

I first read The Inner Game in the spring of 2004, at the end of a mostly unsuccessful freshman year in music school. The demand for hours of daily practice is one of the major reasons that people drop out of music school. Spending anywhere from 2 to 8 hours per day alone in a small room with your instrument, fighting to meet the standards of yourself and your professors, can quickly drive you insane. Continue reading “Book Review: The Inner Game of Tennis”